The Best Flowers And Plants for A Summer And Fall City Garden

Being part of the Northeast region of the U.S., New York has a humid climate with long periods of warmth during spring and summer seasons, and very cold weather during the fall and winter months. Given the climate, there are certain types of native and introduced garden plants that thrive in New York, as well as along the Northeastern coast. If you are working on a garden layout that will take you through the rest of summer and into the fall months, you came to the right place. Today we are going to list the best flowers and plants for a New York summer and fall garden.

Summer Plants + Flowers

Astilbe (Veronica selections)

The astilbe plant is a richly colorful, dense flower with thick foliage. Growing best in early summer, this plant grows to 2-feet tall and wide. It requires shade and moist to wet soil. Plant alongside other shade loving plants with contrasting colors for a gorgeous garden layout.

Bee Balm (Monarda selections)

The Bee Balm is a regional wildflower in Northeast, growing rich red, pink, violet and white flowers. The foliage is mint-scented, which is a huge benefit because pests leave it alone. Bee balm grows with full sun in moist, well-drained soil. Plant these flowers alongside white flowers for a contrasting, summer-y feel in your garden.

Hydrangeas (hydrangeas macrophylla)

Who doesn’t love hydrangeas? Easy to care for and beautiful, hydrangeas prove to be the ultimate summer-time flower. These plants love moist, well-drained soil, morning sun and afternoon shade. Just water them when you get home from work. Don’t forget hydrangeas in your garden design – they flower beautifully in shades of blue, pink and white.

Butterfly Weed (asclepias tuberosa)

These bright orange flowers are perfect for your garden because not only are they beautiful, but they attract butterflies! This plant requires sun, and can grow in both dry and moist soil, but prefers bright, well-drained sandy soil. You won’t want to leave these out when designing your garden and landscape plan.

Fall Plants + Flowers

Korean Mum (Chrysanthemum)

Add some warm and soft color into your Autumnal garden design with some Korean Mums. These plants are generally pest- and disease-resistant and later-blooming. Growing in white, pale yellow and warm and cool pink, these hardy perennials grow best in full sun and well-drained rich soil. Plant in the spring, and watch these beauties flourish in the fall.

BeautyBerry (Callicarpa Dichotoma)

You will not want to leave these purple beauties out of your landscape plan. This purple-ish plant is not only stunning, but it grows year-round and blooms in mid-summer so it is ready for your fall garden! It requires sun to partial shade, and attracts bees, butterflies and some birds.

Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens)

These are the perfect blooms for your autumnal garden landscaping. Growing best in full to partial sun and requiring a moderate amount of watering, these violet flowers are low maintenance. You can even grow this plant in the summer too. Feature them in your garden in hanging baskets, window boxes or even houseplants.

Panicle Hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata ‘Tardiva’)

Tardiva is an autumnal flowering plant with white flower heads that turn purple/pink as they get older. These white blooms grow best in moist, well-drained soil and in sun to partial shade, and require minimal pruning. If you’re going to be landscaping in the fall months, consider incorporating these hydrangeas.

If you’re interested in landscape design services in New York City, give us a call at Amber Freda. We can’t wait to help you with your garden and landscape plan!

1 reply
  1. Lloyd's Landscaping
    Lloyd's Landscaping says:

    Hi there, Great tips by the way and thank you. I did have
    a question though. I’m hoping you can answer it for me since you
    seem to be pretty knowledgeable about gardening. How do shovel headed garden worms help in your garden?
    If you had some insight I would greatly appreciate it.

    Reply

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